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URBAN ZEN

Ansleigh Place, W11

MmMmMmMmMmMmMmMmMmMmMmMmMmMmMmMmMmMmMmMmMmMmMmMmMmMmMmMmMmMmMmMmMmMmMmMmMmMmMmMmMmMmMmMmMmMmMinimalism has been given a bad name in recent years. The main problem is that it has often been executed so badly that people now associate it with a white room and a single chair. Good examples may be hard to come by but this property on Ansleigh Place is a perfect showcase for how it should be done.

Stripped of everything that is unnecessary, the white walls are the perfect backdrop for the exquisite stone flooring and feature wall. The setting is almost monastic with perhaps a hint of Japanese influence, especially with its monochrome colour scheme with just a single red chair. We wonder if the owner was influenced by Tadao Ando, the influential Japanese minimalist architect whose Zen-like creations rely heavily on geometry.

Everything is pared back to what is useful rather than polluting the space with unnecessary objects. One wall seems to provide a canvas for an elaborate artwork that turns out to be a state-of-the-art radiator. The clean lines extend into the dining area with its circular table and matching curved bench. Beyond are monochrome walls that look like pieces of art themselves.

The Zen-like feeling really comes to the fore in the bathrooms. The pared-down aesthetic is perfect for the glass ‘trough’ sink and the slate shower/steam room. In a second bathroom, richly grained wood beautifully contrasts with limestone walls and flooring.

Some say minimalism is hard to live with. We disagree. When it’s done as beautifully as this, who wouldn’t want to live here?

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